Friday, March 23, 2007

True is not Blue, according to CEO Herb Vest.


Since this story ran Monday in the New York Times—in which full-of-shit Vest denies that his ads are pornographic—I've gotten another couple of anon email tips about true.com and CEO Vest.
  • Piling on to this post, the first tipster confirms that Vest is the defendant in at least two lawsuits: go here (link), and then enter these two case numbers: 05-05-01366 CV and 05-05-01710 CV. I'm too lazy to dig into the cases, but be my guest.
  • A second tipster says that the reason that Vest is not exactly prompt in returning true.com member fees (a fact covered in the Times piece) is that he needs the money to pay his legal fees. He/she also says that Vest ripped off his Mother and Sons of millions.
Herb says he started his dating site after looking at the high divorce rate in America: "That’s (the divorce rate) a bunch of nonsense. I can do something about that..." Vest is on his third marriage.
previously in true.com ads:
1. Holly's Once, Twice, Three Times A Lady...
2. BIKINI KILL
3. ...so feel free to wear your tightest short-shorts ladies...
4. BREAKING NEWS NOW...
related: Fleshbot's take on the advertising.

8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Illinois Online Dating Bill Defeated
Today the Illinois legislature did what the Florida legislature wouldn’t do – crush a bad online dating bill in committee.

I had a premonition that things would go well in Springfield. Hey, it’s the Land of Lincoln and Illinois is the state where I was born!

But superstitions aside, the members of a House Judiciary Committee really carried the day here with their probing questions and clued-in skepticism about HB 563, the Internet Dating Disclosure and Safety Awareness Act.

Take Rep. Jim Sacia for instance. He’s an ex-FBI agent that really knew the difference between background checks and criminal screenings. He said that criminal screenings—the kind contemplated by all of the state online dating bills, were incomplete and too easily defeated to mean anything.

First, Rep. Sacia described the kind of thorough background check that makes use of lots of input data to dig deep into one’s personal history. It requires having providing such personal information as social security numbers and fingerprinting. This is the kind of analysis I had performed on me before I was admitted to the D.C., Georgia and Virginia bars.

Then he described the criminal background screenings that True.com obtains from Rapsheets. This check requires only credit card information and a birth date. But it only provides felony conviction and registered sex offender information.

But here’s the whammy: in many states--including Florida and Illinois--only a small percentage of counties report to a central database accessible by companies that provide criminal background screenings for online dating providers.

So…a criminal screening provides limited data from a limited pool of people…and legislators are—through mandated disclosures—wanting to imply that they’re good for consumers?

Rep. Sacia understood the false sense of security that would result from passing the bill. But so too did many of the other members of the committee. And they overwhelmingly voted against HB 563.

Which makes me feel for the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Bradley. I think he’s just one of the many legislators that have been bamboozled by Herb Vest and True.com. Related to this, my colleague Steve DelBianco has a blog post where he explains a recent New York Times article about True and hopes that legislators aren’t fooled by the false promises behind True.com’s propaganda.

Some of you may remember my post Discouraged Advocate Seeks Legislators that Refuse to Coddle where I describe my jadedness upon coming back from Tallahassee. For now, color me optimistic.

8:54 AM  
Blogger Jay said...

Do women get the same ads from True? What about gay dudes? I've always wondered if I get the ads based on my MySpace profile.

I love when I see a dating service ad that features a head shot of a woman I remember seeing on a porn site spreading her legs and exposing her vagina. It helps me relive past wanks. Who knew she couldn't find a date!

11:24 AM  
Anonymous Lardog said...

The wrist bone underneath the arm that's covering the left nipple - am I the only one that things it's fucking hot! It's like a tumor of sorts on first glance. I can't notice anything else about the ad. Bravo to true.com going after the birth defect niche.

12:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Told you so. You should have made your move and taken that copywriting job at True when i posted it.

2:32 PM  
Anonymous Jumper Bailey said...

I got a kick out of this NYT article. Vest came across as the quintessential "Louie" from Casablanca. His brazenly disingenuous schtick was a hoot.

"I'm shocked...shocked...that some people think my ads are soft porn."

Or words to that effect.

7:32 PM  
Blogger Viviane said...

That article was annoying.

And then on Sunday, I clicked on a Google AdSense ad, was taken to a dating page, which seemed to just be a doorway page for True.com.

I'll stick to Alt.com thankyouverymuch.

6:17 PM  
Blogger Harry+ said...

I'll take those True ads any day over the puke-inducing Lavalife ads in the subway.

But all hose dating sites are scams. I go lo-tech and opt for alcohol and humping the hoochies dancing to hip hop in the bar.

12:01 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Change your "Sexual preference" flag on MySpace, and yes, you'll get different ads. If you set it for "gay male" you'll see shirtless guys with no body hair. "Straight male" - you get the hot chixXx.

9:16 PM  

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